How To Help Your Child Find Their True Purpose

How To Help Your Child Find Their True Purpose
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The word dharma resonates deeply within me. Put most simply, our dharma is our true-life purpose. Our calling. I believe we all possess a unique gift that we are intended to share in this physical lifetime.

I remember the recently passed, Wayne Dyer, talking about one’s dharma and it struck a personal chord. He explained a bumblebee knows what it has been born to do. “To bumble and do what bees do” and that a tree knows its life purpose, as does the beautiful rose. He went on to say, that as humans we tend to interfere and divert from our natural purpose. I have witnessed this in my own life, we can cross paths with our intended journey, we can claim it, we can flirt with it and sometimes sadly we can miss our calling all together.

I remind my own children regularly, that they each have a special talent to share with our world. It is crucial message, setting a foundation to their individual life journeys.  Quite consciously, I remove pressure and expectations from their respective achievements and performances. I encourage that they try a myriad of varying opportunities, to experiment and see what resonates with their true spirit. The special “thing” that each child is intended to share, that ‘magic’, that ‘unique gift’, I trust will naturally weave its way into their existence. We must as parents be careful in our coaching and guidance. Our own expectations, even our own unfulfilled dreams or desires can impose limitations or restrictions upon our child’s authentic purpose.

My eldest daughter recently showed me a maths test result. I praised her achievement and talked through the particular unit of maths. She expressed her concern that two of her friends received a higher score and that maths was a subject she really has to apply herself to. The look of concern on her little face worried me. I asked her why she was so distracted over her friends’ scores. She explained that with the commitment she had invested into this subject, she had expected she would have achieved similar results. I asked her;

“Do you enjoy maths?”

“Not really, the formulas and equations are just so difficult. It doesn’t feel easy. I wish I didn’t have to study maths.”

“How can we help you?”

“I don’t need help. I’m passing. I’m not really worried, just frustrated Mum.”

“What else are you studying that feels more natural to you?’ I asked.

“That’s easy”, she replied. “There’s a heap. I love writing, persuasive text is my favourite. Science thrills me. There’s something so fascinating about the Chinese language. My horse riding lessons never seem long enough. And sprinting, my legs have a mind of their own, and I run fast.”

I wrapped my arms around her and reassured her that these pursuits were her natural tendencies. “You don’t have to be good at everything. Accept your maths results. Don’t compare yourself to others. You need to find what makes YOU, YOU.”

My new book Little Angels bestows many affirmations for children, that I hope will help reduce fear and anxiety in our beautiful, individual blossoms. Check out my website for stockists: www.sarahfiggins.com

 

 

 

 

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